Saturday, March 21, 2015

California Wines Sued for Containing Dangerous Levels of Arsenic

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LOS ANGELES — If you are trying to save money on wines you may end up paying more in hospital bills. A lawsuit was against winemakers for having dangerous levels of arsenic in their products. Included are those California wines like Korbel, Sutter Home, Fetzer, Two-Buck Chuck, Beringer, Franzia, Mogen David and Almaden. There are 83 wines were listed in the lawsuit. According to the lawsuit the wine contained dangerous levels of arsenic compared to drinking water standards. It was filed by 4 California residents.

In response to the lawsuit, Wine Institute said that it is "irresponsible", they also said that they have not called for any recall. "We believe this allegation is false and misleading and that all wines being sold in the U.S. marketplace are safe," they said.

Here are the 83 bottles of wine cited in a lawsuit for cointaining dangerously high levels of arsenic, all are from 28 California wineries and were bottled under 31 different brand labels:

— Acronym (GR8RW Red Blend).
— Almaden (Heritage White Zinfandel, Heritage Moscato, Heritage Chardonnay, Mountain Burgundy, Mountain Rhine, Mountain Chablis).
— Arrow Creek (Coastal Series Cabernet Sauvignon).
— Bandit (Pinot Grigio, Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon).
— Bay Bridge (Chardonnay).
— Beringer (White Merlot, White Zinfandel, Red Moscato, Refreshingly Sweet Moscato).
— Charles Shaw (White Zinfandel).
— Colores Del Sol (Malbec).
— Glen Ellen by Concannon (Glen Ellen Reserve Pinot Grigio, Glen Ellen Reserve Merlot).
— Concannon (Selected Vineyards Pinot Noir).
— Cook's (Spumante).
— Corbett Canyon (Pinot Grigio, Cabernet Sauvignon).
— Cupcake (Malbec).
— Fetzer (Moscato, Pinot Grigio).
— Fisheye (Pinot Grigio).
— Flipflop (Pinot Grigio, Moscato, Cabernet Sauvignon).
— Foxhorn (White Zinfandel).
— Franzia (Vintner Select White Grenache, Vintner Select White Zinfandel, Vintner Select White Merlot, Vintner Select Burgundy).
— Hawkstone (Cabernet Sauvignon).
— HRM Rex Goliath (Moscato).
— Korbel (Sweet Rose Sparkling Wine, Extra Dry Sparkling Wine).
— Menage A Trois (Pinot Grigo, Moscato, White Blend, Chardonnay, Rose, Cabernet Sauvignon, California Red Wine).
— Mogen David (Concord, Blackberry Wine).
— Oak Leaf (White Zinfandel).
— Pomelo (Sauvignon Blanc).
— R Collection By Raymond (Chardonnay).
— Richards Wild Irish Rose (Red Wine).
— Seaglass (Sauvignon Blanc).
— Simply Naked (Moscato).
— Smoking Loon (Viognier).
— Sutter Home (Sauvignon Blanc, Gerwurztraminer, Pink Moscato, Pinot Grigio, Moscato, Chenin Blanc, Sweet Red, Riesling, White Merlot, Merlot, White Zinfandel).

Saturday, March 7, 2015

Caramel Color in Soda can Cause Cancer

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There is a new discovery that link the soda's caramel color to cancer. Many experts believe that some ingredients in soda can cause fatal disease but there are no direct link, however this time researchers found a direct link between caramel color and cancer.

A study from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health that was published in PLOS ONE journal with a title "Caramel Color in Soft Drinks and Exposure to 4-Methylimidazole: A Quantitative Risk Assessment." The research team use a sample from 110 brands of different sodas with caramel coloring and they have found different levels of 4-Methylimidazole (4-MEI). 4-Methylimidazole (4-MEI) gives the dark brown color for soda drinks like Coke and Pepsi. What they have found out is that most of the sodas contained dangerous levels of 4-MEI, which could ultimately lead to a high caramel color cancer risk.

Based on a data research about 57% of people drink a can of soda per day, which heighten the danger of over-consumption of the carcinogen.

PhD Keeve Nachman, the lead researcher of the study, said "Soft drink consumers are being exposed to an avoidable and unnecessary cancer risk from an ingredient that is being added to these beverages simply for aesthetic purposes. This unnecessary exposure poses a threat to public health and raises questions about the continued use of caramel coloring in soda."